What have I been doing?

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I realise it’s been time since I last posted on my site – I want to give a bit of an update as to what I’ve been up to and what my plans are for the rest of the year; certainly for September!

Since my last post I’ve managed to pass the second year of my degree in Creative Writing and English Literature, which was a bit of a mixed bag but I’m looking forward to starting my final year at the end of the month. I do want to reflect on Year 2 and I’ll aim to get that reflection up before I stick my head into the breech once again!

As I’ve finished University for the summer, I’ve taken a bit of a summer break. A couple of months ago I finished the first draft of my post-apoc novel The Thaw which was great, and the rest I’ve taken has been really good – it was an intense writing process and allowing myself some time to chill before I approach anything more creative has been great, as burning out is not something I want to experience. I now feel refreshed enough to be able to now properly begin looking over the draft and beginning the editing process, which I’m excited to start as I truly feel The Thaw is going to be a great book!

Speaking of reading, I’ve been playing a bit of catchup with my Goodreads Reading Challenge for the year. I’m already reflecting that 40 books is perhaps the upper limit of what I feel is achievable for myself without reading becoming mechanical and formulaic – I don’t want to find myself reading just to tick off the right number of books, and it’s hard to go from one book to another. I find a couple of days break is helpful between stories.

Thinking about my reading (and how I’m essentially chasing my challenge target), I realise I’ve been fairly remiss in posting reviews. These, I definitely feel, are worthwhile endeavours for building my critical skills so I’m going to be getting on that again very soon! As a writer, it’s good to be able to synthesise meaningful, precise feedback – how can I expect to take feedback when I never give it out? It’s a symbiotic thing I think is important about writing as a craft.

So then – what to expect from me in September?

  • At least a couple of book reviews; maybe more, when I pillage my “read” list.
  • I’ve been working on a new little short story called The Landlady which I hope to post this month!
  • My Year 2 University reflection.
  • A mini-post about my recent, brief trip to Edinburgh during the Fringe (which I really enjoyed)
  • A potentially controversial blogpost opining on the new Doctor Who (started this a while ago but I need to be in a certain mood to add to it!)

Regardless, it’ll be great to reconnect with my blog and get posting again, as it’s something I definitely want to do more of and become regular again. So stay tuned!

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Defrosting The Thaw – My Planning Process

I was asked to write about how I planned my post-apocalyptic novel The Thaw, and seeing as I’m pretty much done with the first draft and am going to be putting it away for a while before I start editing, it’s a great opportunity to look back at the workflow I devised, see how it worked out, and perhaps reflect and think about how I can further improve this.

My general goal as a writer is to learn and adapt my workflow with each project I embark upon. Learning what works best, and exploring new ideas is a great way to show evolution of my skills. I remember quite vividly the first novel I attempted to write, and how I didn’t plan it, really, and I didn’t even chapterise it, which made editing it a nightmare and hence it’s mothballed. Not to say I’m, not proud of what I’ve done; but I’m still not in a place to do the heavy lifting to realise that project just yet. But stay tuned!

I was surprised to discover quite how invaluable Microsoft OneNote was for planning. OneNote has proved an effective and invaluable tool for laying out notes for my various projects. I use OneNote quite extensively at university for tracking lecture notes and essay plans and I like several aspects of it. First, it’s available everywhere – I can sync my notes, via OneDrive, to any device, whether that be my iPad, iPhone, desktop PC, ThinkPad or even anywhere via the web, which is invaluable as inspiration can strike in the oddest places, so I can get my phone, and quickly write down ideas or snippets of thoughts and know it’ll all be catalogued in one online notebook.

OneNote’s format also pretty much gets rid of formatting that I feel can be constraining. I can write anywhere on the page in OneNote, so I’m not limited to overly linear formats on the page – I can draw links to ideas wherever; this is most useful on my iPad – I use this with a keyboard but the touch/ink facilities there can be invaluable.

onenote-1In terms of how I use OneNote specifically for The Thaw, let’s look at my folder tree. I have a single folder for The Thaw inside a writing notebook linked to my account, separate from my university and personal notebooks. I can create pages, and subpages. Nothing gets thrown away, either, hence a variety of versions of the plot outline.

The plot outline for The Thaw was always in my mind, but planning the outline was probably the hardest aspect of the book as I had a very cloudy overall feel for what I wanted, and the core signposts of the story, but the specifics were at times really hard to. It took a couple of tries to get something I found was workable, but my general philosophy was to not over-plan the chapters; this would make the actual writing feel both too constrained (like joining the dots) and I’d also know I’d get subconsciously anxious about deviating too much from “the plan”. So I decided on a structure I feel was a good compromise – I detailed general aims for the chapter in the heading, with four of five key plot events that should take place. I also put checkboxes on each of the chapter headings so I could see at a glance what was done; I also implemented a quite useful “point of view” tag for the characters each chapter was seen through, using different coloured fonts to easily differentiate, so I knew how long at a glance it had been since a point of view shift, et cetera.

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This is a format I feel worked really well, so it’s a structure I feel very comfortable using in the future. My plot outline wasn’t massively detailed (indeed, I didn’t document a whole lot of the backstory, but this is something I want to do as I’m going to be hinting at a lot of it in future drafts) but it served a purpose as a series of signposts, not barriers, to keep me roughly in line with what I thought I should. But also it was a flexible outline style so that helped keep it malleable when waves of inspiration struck and threw everything into disarray, as these things do. It’s extremely easy to plan every item of minutiae into the outline and I tried to avoid that as it just sucks the fun out of writing – there’s no discovery to the writing process and it’s just too constrained.

My only real regret is that, as I was writing The Thaw, I didn’t necessarily become disciplined in keeping the outline in OneNote up-to-date with what was happening in the actual draft. Again, I’m glad the story gained a sense of organic growth, but I feel I have in some respects made life difficult for myself by not keeping the outline updated with as much discipline as I should have; for instance, the end chapter has been quite difficult to write as the outline is very scant.

Looking at my outline file now, I focused mainly on the plot of the book, with relatively scant details on characters and settings, mainly because they were assembled in my head and translating them to the notebook was difficult. That’s not to say I’m not going to nail down my character profiles and my backstory ideas – of which I’ve had many! – because I feel having that overview of characters, their desires, needs, wants and fears, and also a written and codified “bible” of the world my story takes place in is just the sort of detail that needs to be consistent to be added into a future draft, so my “month long vacation” from the book that I’m planning may be spent drawing maps, writing profiles and working out the intricacies of this post-apocalyptic world I’ve created – and that’s something I actually cant’ wait to do!

I definitely feel I should’ve taken more time to plan more of the story – I began the draft with the plan for the initial act and half of the second; I feel a bit more gestation time would’ve been useful but conversely, I was glad to begin and not be too bound by what I thought would work so that any ideas I came up with – especially for the middle portion of the book, which was easily the most difficult to plan – would disrupt that. However, I did feel that I’d been planning The Thaw for months, perhaps to procrastinate from actually putting the first words down, so I did eventually just decide to be bold and throw the words down, with the overall plan never far from my thoughts, if not my OneNote file!

Like OneNote, Dropbox was a key cornerstone of my workflow, and it worked largely behind the scenes as a key method for both ensuring my drafts were kept backed up online, and not slaved to one computer (and ferried around on an easily-lost USB key, or constantly “emailed to myself”). I’ve a dedicated writing folder in my Dropbox for all my work this year, and I have archival folders going back to 2010. With the baked in support for my iPhone and iPad there’s really no excuse for a writer to not use a solution like Dropbox to keep their work backed up.

I also elected to use Dropbox as my working folder, so when working on my draft in Scrivener, it would be updated pretty much automatically, which worked well for making sure changes were saved in a timely manner, and also cut out another step of remembering to copy the project into Dropbox. With the way Scrivener works on Windows (projects are comprised of folders populated with many smaller files that contain the text etc), it also made a lot more sense to just work on the project from Dropbox direct. Now, Scrivener’s an entirely different beast that I will talk about separately because I’d not really be able to write The Thaw without it; sure, I could’ve written in Word but Word, from previous experience, is not best suited to long-form narrative projects whereas Scrivener is tailor-made for this work.

I was quite lucky that I didn’t run into any conflicting issues with having the project open on more than one computer or device; Scrivener, the writing software I used (I will talk later in depth as to how useful Scrivener has been) has some built-in protections from that.

Overall though I’d definitely attribute OneNote and Dropbox as key tools in my writer’s toolbox, because writing a book like The Thaw really demands at least some consideration of the planning process that goes on for a long time before writing starts. I’m really confident in The Thaw so I wanted to do the idea and concept justice with planning, but at the same time striking a balance between letting the story have the right amount of space to evolve and take its own course, in a way, but while also having a general idea, written down, of key events that need to happen – so it’s about applying my learning process from previous projects to this one. I do feel that I maybe almost spent a bit too long thinking about it  – outlining is possibly the hardest part of novel writing for me because it’s the literal application of ideas to a blank page, but I definitely feel I had a workable structure to my overall plan and I had the tools to help me shape that plan throughout the writing process!

The Thaw: Project Update

I was pretty pleased to recently finally break my 100,000 word target for the first draft of the post-apocalyptic novel, The Thaw, that I have been writing since last July. It was a big moment that I captured in a somewhat successful Facebook livestream. Considering my initial plan was 60,000 and then 70,000 words I’m impressed myself in what I have achieved! It’s not been plain sailing as perhaps I’d originally foresaw but projects like these are organic and gain a life of their own, almost; The Thaw certainly has!

Photo 20-05-2017, 10 37 00 pmI’m absolutely thrilled to have pulled this together – but my draft isn’t complete! First, the chapter I wrote during the livestream only barely touched upon a third of the planned narrative I wanted to cover, and I did discover that livestreaming writing does pile on the pressure, which isn’t ideal for a crucial part of the work but this is an experience I needed to learn from. But regardless of the perceived quality of what I wrote, I’m pretty confident that some of the ideas borne of that writing session hold weight and I want to include them into the final first draft. I plan to finally finish off the main bulk of the story (I plan a sort-of epilogue chapter to round off the book set some time after the climax) very soon.

And then I’m going to take some time off from the book before I even give the first draft a reading as a complete unit. I need some distance from the project, to cool off from it so that when I re-approach it late in the summer my mind is fresh and ready to appraise it and begin the editing phase. I’ve made a fair few notes during the first draft of things I want to change, improve, clarify (I didn’t want to go back while drafting; my ethos was to steam ahead only; I can fix stuff later) but an initial reading with a cleared mind will no doubt turn up other questions and points.

I’m really looking forward to editing it but I’m absolutely right, I feel, to take a break from the project and give it space to breathe. I do have some great plans for how I’m going to approach the editing but that plan remains somewhat in flux.

Again, I’m so proud of myself that I’ve managed to write The Thaw (especially given difficult personal circumstances) and I’m confident that the concepts at its heart are going to make a compelling story that I can’t wait to share more of. I’ve been pretty dogged in getting the first draft together; I can’t wait to tell you about my characters in a lot greater detail as the summer progresses!

Website Update

I realise I have been absent in posting updates to my site recently, which is a shame as I enjoy posting – but I do have some valid excuses! And I haven’t done a Website Update in so long it felt only right to briefly talk about what I’ve been doing and what I’m going to be doing for the next while!

So a lot of what’s occupied a lot of my time in the last month or two, and has really precluded my working on personal projects has been finishing the second year of my Creative Writing degree at Kingston University. It’s been… a mixed bag but I’m definitely. at this point, glad to have gotten my assignments submitted – and some of them I’m pretty proud of. I’m absolutely, over the summer, going to reflect on this year and contrast it to how I felt about first year like I did previously. But naturally, these assignments have been important to do as I need to complete them to progress. I’m relatively confident I’ve achieved what I need to – it’s been a difficult, challenging but also enlightening year.

I’ve also very nearly completed the first draft of my post-apoc novel The Thaw. This has taken longer than I originally anticipated but with that extra time I feel I’ve not rushed things and I’m solidly happy with what I’ve produced. I’ve a couple of chapters left to do and they’re important ones – so I’ve taken some time to a) get University commitments done first and b) give these concluding chapters a lot of thought so I can execute the end of my story as best I can. But I’m also seriously proud of what I have achieved here – with personal circumstances being quite difficult at times – and I look forward to moving forward with my next planned steps. I’ve learned a lot while writing The Thaw and I want to codify those lessons into something definite!

Also, recently, with my good friends (and independent filmmakers) Gary Thomas and Mark Lever we’ve embarked upon a new film project – a Doctor Who-themed fan film entitled Reverence of the Daleks. This has been a really fun project that’s finally got started and I look forward to sharing more about it very soon (there’s not much to show from the first filming day just yet, though I think chatting about the writing process would be a good idea too)

Sadly my Goodreads reading challenge is quite badly lagging – I’m about 3-4 books behind schedule as it is and my review list is lengthy. I enjoy writing book reviews as it’s a good opportunity to synthesise what I liked and didn’t like about a book – this is helpful as an author as generic feedback such as “I liked it!” is pretty much useless. Again, a combination of personal circumstances and University deadlines being an absolute priority have meant I’ve had to dial back on my reading – but with Summer here I aim to put the pedal to the metal and enjoy some cracking reads!

Recently, too, I’ve found writing about my battles with depression and my mental health has been an invaluable and infinitely useful tool for dealing with this, and I’m humbled by the support I have gotten, and if my experiences can help others struggling with depression – a condition I feel is widely misunderstood – then that’s all the validation I need. My writing on the subject is meant to be cathartic, but also reflective. Looking positive about this can be very difficult but when it is done, it’s just extremely comforting and engaging to know, even if only one person reads, it’s not confined to my head.