10 Books to Read in 2017 to Improve My Writing

I’ve recently made a good crack at starting my 2017 Goodreads Challenge, upping my goal from 35 to 40 books. Obviously I intend to enjoy this immensely but it’s a good opportunity to approach some books that I feel would be beneficial in reading, not only because they’re great reads but because I feel they’d be a good influence on my own work, especially with my own novel that I am currently working on, The Thaw.

day_of_the_triffidsThe Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham

I recall watching a recent television adaptation of this book a few years ago and I enjoyed that, so it makes sense to see the original book. While researching this post I was surprised to see how recent The Day of the Triffids is, originating in the 1950s; reading more ‘classics’ is certainly a goal and I feel the setting – a futuristic England beset by killer plants – is both unique enough a premise to still maintain some relevance today. I certainly am looking forward to seeing how a post-apocalyptic Britain envisaged in the 1950s is realised. Plus, by all accounts, it’s just a cracking read!

the_children_of_menChildren of Men by PD James

Another saw-the-film-ages-ago kind of deal; again, I thought the 2006 film was gripping and appropriately desolate and bleak; archetypal post-apocalyptic fare but the film was effective. The premise, too, of the human race being sterile is close to my own plot elements in The Thaw, where children and genetic engineering are brought together in a quite harrowing way, makes this book almost ‘required reading’ considering what I’m working on.

world_war_zWorld War Z by Max Brooks

Again, this seems almost too trite to be true, considering my own work is currently happily residing in the post-apocalyptic genre, but I figured it’s about time to give this book a go, even as I didn’t manage to watch the film version. This is especially true considering, I believe, it’s almost the go-to when ‘zombie fiction’ is thought of. I’d a while ago discounted the zombie subgenre as almost too derivative to be meaningful anymore but I’m re-approaching my stance and, from what I’ve read, World War Z is a worthy bastion of zombie post-apocalyptic fiction.

battle_royaleBattle Royale by Koushun Takami

The Hunger Games wasn’t a bad series, even if the protagonist was a bit too far along the ‘whiny angsty antihero’ path, but one thing that I feel would’ve done the series credit was more violence. This would truly and effectively show the horror that comes from forcing children into a fight to the death. I’ve been recommended Battle Royale a couple of times because it doesn’t shy away from those kinds of visceral depictions so I’m going to finally grab a copy and see what a ‘proper’ Hunger Games is like.


the_standThe Stand
by Stephen King

Getting into King’s work last year was really good, and I definitely want to read his post-apocalyptic epic The Stand; like with the others on this list, I want to see how these different authors portray their settings and how their characters interact with each other and the wider worlds. King’s thrillers have been pretty atmospheric, creepy and gripping so The Stand is an obvious choice to read. I’m a tiny bit intimidated by The Stand’s length but I’ll overcome that!

the_firemanThe Fireman by Joe Hill

Again, a lot like the other post-apoc books on my list, I want to read The Fireman because it’s a pretty well-regarded outing in the genre that’s been on the periphery of my radar for a while. My goal in reading these books is to sample a good flavour of the variety available in the post-apoc genre so I can better see how my own work fits in! Plus, it’s by Stephen King’s son so it’ll be interesting to compare and contrast with King’s work!

on_writingOn Writing by Stephen King

I’ve recently started building a “writer’s library” of books that have advice pertinent to my craft. Again, it’s easy to buy a load of “tip books” but not implement so I’m being picky in which advice books I get. On Writing is cited all the time as a great book in terms of the craft and certainly one I intend to read closely, largely because I’m enjoying discovering King’s work and he writes books that are not-too-dissimilar to my own interests.

a_game_of_thronesA Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

I’ve put off reading the Game of Thrones books mainly as the TV show is great, and I didn’t want my viewing of the TV show to cloud my interpretation of the books. However, now I feel quite confidently that enough time has passed that I can finally begin the books. I’ve read snippets and I’ve been pleased with how plain-speaking the books seem to be (this overuse of archaic, twee language that is a common pitfall in fantasy is why I couldn’t finish Assassin’s Apprentice). I’ve generally avoided fantasy, mainly as I feel a lot of fantasy is ultimately derivative of The Lord of the Rings which I controversially find unreadable. However, I feel A Game of Thrones would certainly be useful as a case study in excellent worldbuilding, so I look forward to visiting Westeros in literary form very soon!

19841984 by George Orwell

1984 is a book that sits firmly in the “classics you should’ve read ages ago” category for me, and reading it these days seems awfully relevant and topical. Again, I certainly am interested to see quite how Orwell portrays a dystopian society and I’m sure, as well as being highly enjoyable, it’ll be another strain of dystopian fiction for me to take some notes and inspiration from.

duneDune by Frank Herbert

Dune is another one of those “classic books I should’ve read by now” and I intend to finally get to it. Widely regarded as a science-fiction classic that I actually don’t know a great deal about (apart from how highly it’s regarded), I think the only plausible reason I’ve constantly kicked this one to the kerb is it’s length; however, I’m pretty confident that my reading speed has increased enough that it’s not going to consume too much of my time.

If you want to keep an eye on how I’m getting on with my reading then by all means check out my 2017 Goodreads Challenge page!

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